Thursday, July 06, 2006

Christians standing up for Wiccan rights

Christianity Today has the most recent update to a story that Mysanal (over at LJ) and I have been folowing with some interest.

I had thought the poor widow was closer to getting her request for a pentacle on her husband's memorial marker. Looks lie we need to keep the fires burnign on this one.

We fight for freedom of religion for ALL or for none.

H/T- BLACKFIVE

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6 Comments:

At July 06, 2006 8:31 PM, Blogger Dee said...

Thank you! What a wonderful article! May I link to you?

I'd heard she was still getting stonewalled. *sigh*

 
At July 06, 2006 8:42 PM, Blogger Alicia said...

Thanks for the article! Goodness, I haven't read Christianity Today in years.

I enjoyed the article, and I enjoyed the viewpoint--that we need to stand up and fight for others' symbols, just as we fight to preserve our own (being able to use "Christmas" in the workplace, for example).

I'd like to think that preserving others' choices like this is a part of Christian (Catholic) testimony...
once again I have a broader question: how do you think this relates to evangelism? What do you think a "testimony" is?

 
At July 06, 2006 9:01 PM, Blogger Kyrie said...

Dee,

Ceratinly you may link to this, or any of my posts!

Alicia,

(being able to use "Christmas" in the workplace, for example).

Or being able to leave a cross in a cemetary where it has been for DECADES. (Your task, look up what I'm talking about- I'll give you a hint, it's in California and the Supreme Court just got involved)

I'd like to think that preserving others' choices like this is a part of Christian (Catholic) testimony...

I think it's more an American trait than a religious one. One must certainly be free to choose Christianity (no forced conversions), but it's the difference between tolerance and acceptance. As Christians we need to be tolerant of other faiths, but not accpeting them as equally valid paths to salvation. When you believe that there is ONE way to salvation, then you cannot be intellectually honest and believe otherwise.

Now, having said that, as AMERICANS
we need to work within our legal system to make sure that ALL faiths are treated eually and equitably.

how do you think this relates to evangelism? What do you think a "testimony" is?

A testimony is simply how you live your life. In the above example, Christians are living their faith in helping another faith gain parity in our legal system. It may have the added effect of having some pagans and wiccans look at Christians and Christianity in a new light, but that's not why we do the things we do.

This ties i to something I wrote to Dee in an email today, so I hope she stops back to read it!

 
At July 06, 2006 9:02 PM, Blogger Kyrie said...

please excuse my hideous typing!

 
At July 07, 2006 10:04 AM, Blogger Alicia said...

You have nothing to worry about with your typing... =) I hope your wrists are feeling all right!

OK, I'd be glad to look up what you're talking about...once again not today, but later on during the weekend.

>As Christians we need to be tolerant of other faiths, but not accpeting them as equally valid paths to salvation. When you believe that there is ONE way to salvation, then you cannot be intellectually honest and believe otherwise.

You put this much more clearly and succinctly than I've been able to so far; if I manage to get my thoughts on that together, may I quote you at some point?

I appreciate the discussion; I've been struggling on the specifics of this one lately. I haven't always managed to communicate it clearly, but I've always thought that: one God, one path, one baptism. It seems like sometimes we, as American Christians, have trouble communicating that on the one hand (communicating that there is objectively only one way, without communicating that we are about to force it upon anyone else)--and sometimes we struggle with the way that works on the other hand (for example, Protestants are Christians, there are just things that they're missing, and you were right--Catholics aren't supposed to go to Protestant services--but their salvation is coming through God, too)--and I wonder where and how to draw the lines.

Do you think this is just an American issue, though, then? I don't think forced conversion is a good idea no matter where you live. Or did you mean that it's a matter in the realm of public action, how we support each other's symbols, and it's a matter in the realm of individual conscience, what we believe about salvation?

 
At July 07, 2006 5:42 PM, Blogger Kyrie said...

>As Christians we need to be tolerant of other faiths, but not accpeting them as equally valid paths to salvation. When you believe that there is ONE way to salvation, then you cannot be intellectually honest and believe otherwise.

You put this much more clearly and succinctly than I've been able to so far; if I manage to get my thoughts on that together, may I quote you at some point?


If I've put something out for public consumption, then you are ceratinly welcome to quote me! ;)

Catholics aren't supposed to go to Protestant services

Almost right. Catholics are not allowed to receive communion in Protestant services, or to take part in any of their community 'rituals'. You can certainly atten chuch with Protestant friends or family though.


and I wonder where and how to draw the lines.


Draw what lines? Send me an email on that one, and we'll go into it further. I'm confused now.

Do you think this is just an American issue, though, then? I don't think forced conversion is a good idea no matter where you live. Or did you mean that it's a matter in the realm of public action, how we support each other's symbols, and it's a matter in the realm of individual conscience, what we believe about salvation?


It's an American issue because we have Freedom of Religion protections written in to our Constitution. We have to defend them even for the religions we disagree with, or they will eventually crumble even for the ones we hold dear.

 

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